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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 18, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am: strong winds with gusts of up to 80 miles per hour batter parts of the uk. more than 60,000 homes are left without power in eastern england. snow causes problems elsewhere. schools closed and drivers are to ta ke schools closed and drivers are to take care. theresa may prepares to welcome france's president macron for his first summit in britain. border controls and brexit are expected to dominate the agenda. britain will spend an extra £41; million to bolster security in calais and commit to take in more migrants. also this hour: patient safety compromised in wales but an ease in pressure in england.
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the cost of going private. var had its first real controversy in english football last night, as chelsea's willian was booked for diving against norwich in the penalty area. welcome to bbc newsroom live. strong winds and snow have been causing travel disruption this morning in many parts of the country. winds gusting at more than 80 miles an hour have left more than 60,000 homes without power. police in lincolnshire have appealed
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to the public to help clear trees which are blocking major roads. fallen trees have also blocked railway lines and roads. commuters in scotland and the north of england have been warned about treacherous driving conditions. the amber warning has been lifted, gales affecting other areas. many of these pictures have been coming to us, travelling conditions are hazardous in many places. we mentioned the delays caused by trees down on railway lines. this isjust one example. these shots in, over the last while. a lot of people trying to clear the problem. affecting people on the morning commute. engineers in the process of
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returning that line to normal. that was surrey. and m25 traffic. very busy. but generally, slowed down in many parts of the country. many people choosing to get to where they need to be in cars, rather than taking public transport. various problems, trees down, back ups on other roads. helen drew is at the dartford crossing. it is pretty busy behind you?m it is pretty busy behind you? it has been busy for a long time. highways england announced last night that the qe2 bridge would be closed because of those high winds, open
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this morning after rush hour. not uncommon. do not forget, a lot of lorries travel to get to the port of dover. this morning was particularly bad. i enter the m25 band that normally takes me about 15, 20 minutes. this morning, the overhead signs said delays of an hour. pretty bad. but the reality was a lot worse. i was on that stretch of the motorway for about ihr 50m. when i got to one mile of the dartford crossing, i was not moving at all. not for about 20, 25 minutes. at about 20 past nine this morning, they reopened that bridge but i could see the tailbacks, incredibly
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long. that is because when the bridge is closed, these tunnels are reduced to two. two in the other direction. people travelling from kent to a six, the tailbacks were long. the cameraman, normally it pretty about half an hour. that took him twice as long. and the back road, around this area, even though it has cleared, it's moving, backroads are more congested than usual. it is expected to take longer to be cleared. are those the earlier tailbacks, or have those east and this is just extra traffic going through? this is a little bit of the earlier tailbacks. the bridge reopened at half past nine, tailbacks expected for about 90
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minutes. some of these are still people trying to do the rush—hour commute. we are seeing the end of this puppet is still going on. thank you very much. that was the dartford crossing. 0ur north of england reporter fiona trott has been in penrith and has been giving us the latest from there. a66 caused to the traffic, he spent. we have had a lot of small on higher ground. 30 centimetres. problems on the a19 as well. about 18 miles of tailbacks, and it is notjust the si'iow. tailbacks, and it is notjust the snow. winds also causing a lot of disruption. thousands of homes without power and suffolk, east anglia and cambridgeshire, gusts of over 80mph. 3000 properties without
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power in lincolnshire, norfolk, cambridgeshire, lincolnshire, that has probably caused some of them. also some damage in derbyshire, norfolk, surrey, and because of the strong winds, all but one railway line blocked in suffolk. delays from manchester piccadilly. the warning is about ice, and mortars have been told to take extra care. fiona in penrith. police in berkshire are trying to tap down —— track down a wolf... police have been warning residents to keep a lookout for the animal. it escaped from a sanctuary, in west berkshire and thames valley police are looking for the animal
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after receiving a call from a member of the public. they saw the wolf. 0bviously telling the public not to approach the animal. it is believed high winds damaged the cage. 0fficers seen close to the school, checking that children were getting in safely. if we have any updates people bring that to you. the severe weather is battering the netherlands as well. in amsterdam, schiphol airport has cancelled all flights due to winds of up to 140 kilometres an hour. the notice came shortly after the national weather service upped its warning to the highest code red level. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly £a5 million and commit to taking in more migrants from calais. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may
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and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon. their meeting, at the army's officer training academy in sandhurst, is being seen as the most important for several years. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. this summit is very deliberately being held at sandhurst, britain's military academy for officer cadets. the venue underlines the fact that britain and france are the key military powers in europe, used to working together and today, committing to greater cooperation. even if the background to all of this, of course, is brexit. and in other ways, britain and france are heading in very different directions. under pressure from president macron, theresa may will take on some migrants stuck in calais and desperate to cross the channel. so, expect more unaccompanied children to be allowed into britain as well as adults who successfully argue that their admission will reunify families. but the longer—term deals will focus on defence. britain is sending three
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british chinook helicopters to mali, they're large troop carrying aircraft which the french badly lacked in their fight against islamists. so, britain will broaden its military involvement in africa without committing troops. in return, france will back—up british forces in the baltic states of estonia. there, confronting the potential russian threat. james robbins, bbc news. in a moment we will go to hugh schofield in paris. first to norman smith in westminster. good morning. is this a deal, £a5 million additional border contribution, that the uk government would be meeting the respective of the context of brexit? this is a deal that has nothing to do with the european union. it is between
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britain and france. when you talk to british politicians on both sides it is seen as a pretty good deal when it comes to britain's sayyid. in effect it means that the border control for those migrants who want to get to britain through calais are carried out at calais and not dover. without that, the likelihood is that many of these migrants would end up at dover and get asylum here. you can imagine the sort of uproar that would provoke. from a british perspective it has been regarded as a good one. some brexiteers and brexit supporting newspapers are unhappy that the government should be forking out. but if you talk privately to many british politicians, they think that 44
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million is worth it to make sure controls stay on the french side. the view from france... what are the thoughts of france won this meeting, what does present macros hope to get from this? simpson with the perception that they are doing the heavy lifting for britain on the border. periodically, politicians talk about tearing up the agreement and shifting the border to britain. that would mean that all my currently at calais would be at dover. the french do not do that because they concede that would bring all sorts of other problems. huge suction point. migrants heading there. the want to keep these
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arrangements in place. but the thing that it arrangements in place. but the thing thatitis arrangements in place. but the thing that it is a responsibility on britain to contribute. periodically, every time there is a meeting, the french push for more resources and get it. i think britain has the recognition that it does have a responsibility and it is in its interest to keep this in place. it is part of the talks today. many other aspects. above all defence and security. 0vershadowing everything, brexit. but brexit is not on the agenda. this is not about brexit. it is about issues went to the relationship between france and britain, both countries want to see that the film. key moment. it is the first thing that macron has been to see theresa may for a summit after brexit. we can send so the relationship is going to change.
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however it is going to develop between these nation states of europe, once the tearing apart of brexit happens. thank you very much. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants. a group of 46 doctors are warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister, which has been seen by bbc news. 0ur wales correspondent sian lloyd reports. we have heard warnings of emergency units in other parts of the uk being at breaking point and this time it is the turn of doctors in wales to speak out. a group of consultants have written to the welsh first minister believed the situation here is the worst it's ever been. this is critically concerning. staff members coming to work — the glue that holds the nhs together coming in doing their shifts but going home in tears and we have got patients in the department when we don't have space to see them
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and we are coming back the next day and some of the patients are still here. the monthly performance figures for wales will be published this morning but in this matter, the consultants warn the first minister: it acknowledges efforts have been made to plan for winter pressures, including more investment, but says it is simply not enough. patient safety is being compromised, the doctors say, and the letter calls for a significant increase in funding. those in charge of the nhs in wales say it's been a very challenging winter, with demands exceeding expectations. they believe there are signs that things are improving. sian lloyd, bbc news. we can go to swansea hospital. now
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that those performance figures are out, providing context for that little that has been written? exactly. and we know from those performance statistics that the four hour target across welsh accident and emergency departments has got washed, has the 12 hour as well. these said nobody should be waiting for longer than 12 hours. dr ramsay, you are the md. 12 hour wise, doing well. about four hours, the worst performing in wales. well. about four hours, the worst performing in waleslj well. about four hours, the worst performing in wales. i think these figures reflect the pressure that hospitals are under. we have some of the sickest patients and we continue to treat them as a priority and we have a lot of specialist staff to
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make sure that the —— they are safe. we want to try to improve. it is distressing that consultants across wales are having to write to the first minister, basically apologising for not being able to deliver the care they feel patients need? fai would agree that there are under significant pressure, that reflects the pressure at the way to hospital. if that weight system is not able to move patients through the hospitals, as quickly as they would like to, this is good to come back to the accident and emergency departments. the receiving of them, the moving of them through the system. an additional 60 million to help from the welsh government, but
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figures have worsened. is it an issue of funding? integration with social care? i think it is both. any additional funding is welcome, but from the medical perspective we do not want to just treat symptoms, but the cause. looking at the hospital today, this morning we had 14 people moving from emergency to the hospital. we had more than 60 people medically discharged too can move away from the hospital. 24 had been in hospital, fit for more than two weeks. flu has played a huge part. high intensity. how much of an issue? we are starting to see the impact, particularly intensive care. maybe those figures could get worse before getting better?” maybe those figures could get worse before getting better? i think a significant risk of that. we were
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expecting a particularly bad year for flu. we have been promoting vaccinations. it is not too late to fax in need. we want to prevent people becoming seriously ill. you have a pilot scheme, helping bed blocking. it staff helping to relieve pressure. is that something, if it is a success she would look to carry on? just overwinter? if it is a success she would look to carry on? just over winter? we were expecting january to be difficult so this is perhaps when we need the most help. it has had some additional benefits. it identifies any particular internal problems that we have, getting things done in a timely way. it also brings staff to the front line, maybe not dealing with patients on a day—to—day basis,
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recognising that they help people. and it also allows us to climb better for next year. thank you very much. the performance figures across wales, worse than last year, that letter sent to the first minister saying that the situation is at crisis level. thank you. in england, pressure on busy nhs units has begun to ease. that's according to officials. latest figures from nhs england up to last sunday showed ambulances experienced fewer delays waiting outside hospital compared to the previous week. the number of ambulances delayed beyond 30 minutes fells by nearly a quarter to 12,500. but the figures showed hospitals remain incredibly busy overall, with an average bed occupancy rate of 94.9% across trusts in england. a retired lecturer has won his appeal bid to challenge a court
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ruling for his wish over a peaceful and dignified death. he said he has felt entombed by mnd. seeking the challenge against the high court ruling against him, he has won the bid to challenge that ruling, over his wish for a peaceful and dignified death. strong winds with gusts of up to 80 miles per hour batter parts of the uk. more than 60,000 homes are left without power in eastern england. snow causes problems elsewhere. theresa may prepares to welcome france's president macron for his first summit in britain. border controls and brexit are expected to dominate the agenda. a warning over patient safety from hospital consultants in wales — but better news in england
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as figures show pressure is easing in a and e. in sport... jo konta staying positive about the future despite the shock exit from the australian open. she was defeated by the world number 123 to be knocked out in the second round in melbourne. bed mistake. antonio conte left angered by the video referee system despite his team reaching the fa cup fourth round at the expense of norwich city. and arsene wenger believes alexis sanchez could move to manchester united in the next 24—48 hours, with mkhitaryan moving as pa rt hours, with mkhitaryan moving as part of that. i will be back with more after half—past. thank you. woody allen's adopted
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daughter has appeared on cbs this morning to talk about her sexual assault claim against the director. allen was investigated over a 1992 claim by dylan farrow that he sexually assaulted her at the family's connecticut home. prosecutors did not charge the film—maker and he has always denied the allegations, which he claims had been fabricated by his former partner mia farrow. she said she wants to bring woody down. this is really what she was trying to do. bring him down. why should i not want to? why should i not be angry? why should i not be hurt? why should i not feel some sort of outrage. 0ak hurt? why should i not feel some sort of outrage. oak ridge that after a ll sort of outrage. oak ridge that after all these years, being ignored and disbelieved, and tossed aside... why should people believe you now?|j
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why should people believe you now?” suppose that is on them. but all that i can do, they speak my truth. and hope. hope? hope that somebody is going to believe me, instead of just hearing. scotland yard says it's investigating a third complaint of sexual assault against the actor, kevin spacey. the allegation relates to an incident in westminster in 2005. kevin spacey, who has not been charged with any offences, has denied previous claims against him. there are calls for all women over the age of 30 to be screened for a faulty gene linked to higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer. research by the barts cancer institute in london found testing would prevent thousands of cancers, and be cost—effective for the nhs. tv and radio presenter chris tarrant has been banned from driving after pleading guilty to driving
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under the influence of alcohol. the former capital radio and who wants to be millionaire presenter was stopped by police in berkshire in november. at reading magistrates court earlier, the 71 year old was disqualified from driving for a year and fined £6,000. modern slavery has been described as despicable by the prime minister, but what about those who have escaped or our but what about those who have escaped 01’ oui’ rescue but what about those who have escaped or our rescue from captain phillips? the co—operative as piloted a scheme to give paid work experience and permanent roles to more than 30 former slaves. newjob, new life. more than a dozen businesses are meeting at westminster to discuss how they can get involved. beforehand, my life was very bad.
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now it's nice. great. i am very happy. peter is a survivor of modern slavery. more than 12 to have been placed insecure work by the co—operative. like thousands before him, he came from romania for a new life. i was looking for a job. and be happy. but many days were spent cold and wet, working at a car wash without pay. 0nly allowed out to open the bank accounts for captors. i was very scared. because it is dangerous. these people are aggressive. they said i'll kill you. he was closely guarded but he escaped when the gang got drunk. your heart beats faster? very. safe
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house to safe job. it isjust the store manager who knows that they are the murder slavery, it is totally confidential. what are the challenges that you have these? making sure this works? they may be do not have a driving licence, bank account, the formal things that we would have, and have had to adapt hr policies to deal with that. in our communities, and estimated 30,000 modern slaves. because they often disappear, that number could be much higher. when survivors escape, often deeply traumatised. could be suffering from panic attacks, be terrified of the police. sometimes the sense of trust has been so deeply eroded that they are suspicious of any support on offer. that can make the scale of the challenge even greater. today, this
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charity alongside the co—operative is meeting with one dozen businesses, hoping to help more survivors. even as consumers, we love hearing when a cooperation has a heart. this will help so many people who have been vulnerable and exploited. a new start. why do you like thejob? exploited. a new start. why do you like the job? i waited because it is nice people. great manager. love my job. peter is an excited man about his future. he is about to take his of holiday, basic freedom that means the world. it's emerged that residents of a privately—owned tower block in south london — with the same cladding as grenfell tower — may be forced to pay up to £2 million for replacement panels. the company which manages citiscape in croydon, which failed a fire safety test following the disaster, said it was "committed
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to minimising" costs. it will take the case to a property tribunal next month, to determine who should foot the bill. researchers from the australian antarctic program were out in two small boats in newcomb bay collecting water samples, when this penguin popped up out of the icy water and into the boat. over the course of the day they had eight curious penguins drop in to check out their work. getting close and personal. time for the weather. windy night. probably woke you up. wind was a problem, we had widespread gusts and some snow across northern england. it was to see of this low pressure. named by
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the france. davide. moving to the netherlands and germany. things at the moment, certainly quieter than first thing. scattered showers for more than an waste nereus, continuing as snow for scotland and it is going to be feeling cold, minus two celsius. it feels like that in the north—east. through this evening and tonight, ice is a risk. lying snow. further snow showers. northern ireland, scotland, west of england. the dry weather, far south east. game, cold feeling day. bye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: severe gales have been causing disruption to much of the uk, with gusts of around 80 miles
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an hour. britain will provide an extra 4.5 million pounds to improve border security at french ports. that's one of the announcements expected when theresa may meets french president emmanuel macron later today. hospital consultants in wales have warned that patient safety safety in welsh a&e units is being "compromised to an unacceptable degree". meanwhile better news in england — latest figures show that hospitals remain very busy, but pressures have eased since last week. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers will have to pay nearly £200 billion for schemes set up under private finance initiatives. a survey by an educational charity suggests some parents are subsiding a childcare scheme for three and four year olds in england, which the government says is free. british number one johanna konta
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was staying optimistic, despite a shock defeat in the second round of the australian open overnight. she was beaten by ‘lucky loser‘ bernarda pera in straight sets — the american only made it into the tournament after another player withdrew with injury. tennis correspondent russell fuller has more from melbourne. pera's performance really caught the eye. she paid with huge confidence. todayjoe contacted eye. she paid with huge confidence. today joe contacted not live eye. she paid with huge confidence. todayjoe contacted not live with her. her service speeds were down. she was troubled by some overheads. crucially she went much point down. there was anxiety spreading through high game in the second set when it
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looked as if the match was going to run away with her. she has now lost eight of her last 11 games. the success that she enjoyed in the two yea rs success that she enjoyed in the two years after first making a name buys up years after first making a name buys up in the us open of two dozen 15, has brought a disappointing run. she says she needs more matches, and is determined to work away through it with her new coach. it's a bit frustrating, but also, i think, with her new coach. it's a bit frustrating, but also, ithink, i with her new coach. it's a bit frustrating, but also, i think, i am still taking good stuff from this. i don't feel by any means like it is a massive catastrophe, obviously. 0bviously, massive catastrophe, obviously. obviously, i play every event to be the answer be end, and i definitely don't want to be going home this early, but i think, in terms of building myself back up again, and playing the way that i want to play, i think, i playing the way that i want to play, ithink, i keep playing the way that i want to play, i think, i keep moving forward. there was a better day for six—time champion novak djokovic who battled back from a set down in 39 degree
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heat to come past gael monfils to reach round three. former champion stan wawrinka is out though. hindered by his troublesome knee, he failed to put up a fight against american tennys sandgren, who eased to a 6—2 6—16—4 win. and yes, sandgren's first name really is "tennis"! nothing to do with the sport sadly though, it's a swedish name. our first ‘head—scratching' moment regarding the new video assistant referee system came last night with a controversial moment in chelsea's fa cup third round win over norwich at stamford bridge. 1—1 after 90 minutes... the game went to extra time with chelsea's willian seemingly going down under a challenge in the penalty area. the referee booked him for diving and the decision remained ‘no penalty‘ after being checked it meant the tie went all the way to penalties with eden hazard
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sending them to a fourth round meeting with newcastle, but all the discussion afterwards was about var with alan shearer clearly not a fan... we all think that is a clear and obvious penalty. and he books for diving. who the hell is looking at that screen and does not think that isa that screen and does not think that is a penalty. that is why it is all wrong. someone else's opinion. that is why it is a shambles. well things were a lot clearer as league one leaders wigan shocked bournemouth of the premier league with a comfortable 3—0 win — they'll take on another top flight side, west ham in the fourth round. in the night's other game swansea beat wolves 2—1. arsenal manager arsene wenger has said this morning a deal to take alexis sanchez to manchester united is "likely to happen". it's become clear that sanchez isn't intending to extend his contract at the emirates stadium but after a proposed move to manchester city appeared to have fallen through, it seems old trafford will be sanchez‘s destination. wenger also said this morning that
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england all rounder ben stokes is due to appear in court on a charge of affray on the same day — the 13th of february — that he was supposed to be making his international comeback in a t20 match in new zealand. the ecb said yesterday that stokes was was likely to join the squad for next month's t20 matches but that court date revealed this morning coincides with the first of those games. stokes was charged earlier this week with affray following an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. a day after signing a contract extension to stay as england head coach until 2021, eddiejones has named eight uncapped players in his six nations squad for the first match against italy. among them is northampton back harry mallinder. injuries and suspensions mean several senior players are out. england are hoping to become the first side to win three successive six nations titles outright. that's all the sport for now.
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i'll have more for you in the next hour. just getting some copy from our home affairs correspondence, in relation to report in an elderly person in kent. alice when services were provided by carillion. they say it took the company three months to deal with a seriously underpowered toilet doors. is the report published today covered the 12 month up published today covered the 12 month up to october 2017, and was written before the collapse of carillion this week. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers could face a bill of almost £200 billion for deals signed under private finance initiatives. the national audit office's report into pfis — schemes where the government can borrow from private firms to build facilities like schools and hospitals —
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found more than 700 deals, with annual charges of more than £10 billion, are still operational. the government says pfi has helped fund vital infrastructure projects. i'm joined via webcam by the former labour strategist john mcternan. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. pfi were introduced by john major, but taken up by tony blair's governments. why so keen on using pfi? when labour came in, in 19 years of conservative neglect and underfunding of hospitals and schools and roads, of railway, and there was 19 years, nearly two decades of capital spending to catch up decades of capital spending to catch up on, and if we had done it the traditional way, lots of schools
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would have hacked to wait and hospitals. this allowed us to do everything at once, and so for example, in1997, everything at once, and so for example, in 1997, there were still schools in england with outside to i lets. schools in england with outside toilets. that was stopped immediately by the pfi funding. that was a very important thing, because there is a limit to what every government can borrow in one year. you can weaken your currency, which leads to problems that we are seeing at the moment is like a higher inflation that comes in through a load exchange rate, and also the threat to british companies, as the a weaker pound,... there was always a weaker pound,... there was always a limit on borrowing, and the question is, do you limit it and accept it, and then wait 20 years, or do you find a way around it. pfi
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was the way around to get the work donein was the way around to get the work done in schools, and go to the new hospital departments. half of the hospitals in 1997 were older than the nhs itself. something had to be done. you like in these pfis to taking out a mortgage. you say that you expect to pay a lot more than the value of what you are borrowing against, but do you think still that the pfi have represented good value for money? yes, i do. pfi was about waiting until you had all the money. nobody in their right mind says every penny for the asking price of a house and then buys it. they borrowed the money. as a consequence, they pay more than the
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asking price of the house. they also spent a lot of money over that 25 yea rs on spent a lot of money over that 25 years on renovations, all repairs, on decorations, on kitchens, or new bathrooms, new furniture. those costs are designed —— of design, and maintenance, where transfers from the private sector, that is why it is an unfair comparison for the national audit office to quote, compared to the end value of the capital asset. dn a0 report says that whitehall has no means of measuring whether achraf three nuhiu are value for money. many people will wonder what that —— was there ever a way of trying to work out whether this would represent value for money at all. under new labour, was there any attempt to quantify what the value for money of the schemes were? well, there is busy
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something rather contradictory about the nal. if they are being critical of pfis, and then they say that there is no way of measuring their value for money, but they seem to be implying there is no value for money. if they really believed what they said, then the report findings would not add up. there was a heavy scrutiny. i know, myself, iwas in a government advisory position in 1997 and 1990s eight. —— 19 98. many schemes were kicked back for not being thought through, for not being correct and not being value for money. there was a process of checking the value for money, and i am surprised that the nar load claim that there wasn't. anyone who has ever worked in government know that
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the treasury are always looking to improve government spending that does not stand up to scrutiny. thank you so much for your thoughts. the tv presenter emily maitlis has said she fears her stalker will never stop harassing her. two days after a former friend was jailed for breaching a restraining order, the newsnight presenter compared living with two decades of harassment to having a chronic illness. speaking to the emma barnett show on bbc radio five live, she said it had had a devastating impact on her family. it just makes itjust makes you it just makes you jumpy, itjust makes you jumpy, you know. and, actually, that is stressful, and it is tiring, and it is time—consuming, and, you know, i think it's hard for everyone, actually, because you then turn into this person who sort of shouts at your kids for the wrong thing, not because they have done anything
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wrong, but because you are stressing about somebody else. you are having to think about things that are ludicrous, you know, like how you get in and out of the front door, and how they are getting back from school. it is not that you think everybody is out to kill you, you recognise that as a paranoia, but, it doesn't make it any easier, it just means that you are... you are just means that you are... you are just not living normally, you know. i get lovely messages of support from people saying, you must be so relieved it's all over. he is in prison. ijust think, you don't understand that this is literally been going on for 20 years. it feels like a sort of chronic illness, sort of thing, for me. it's not like it ever goes away. it's not like i ever
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believe that the system will make him stop. partly, it is the legal system, but partly it is... we haven't clearly found a way of finding something that is both deterrent and helpful to the perpetrator, in a way that would make them stop. something you just said there is very striking. you don't believe it will ever stop? no. you think you will have to live with us you think you will have to live with us for the rest of life? i don't think about it. my way is to deny it completely. i never want to see photos, i never want to here names, i never want to read about it, i never actually... i never want to talk about it. well, i know, and i know this is the first time you have
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spoken on a microphone about it, and this is very difficult for you. you wa nt to this is very difficult for you. you want to carry on with your life and not be defined by this. one thing that i would say is that i have been really well sheltered for most of this, ina really well sheltered for most of this, in a sense, because, i have worked in an organisation with a lot of pastoral care. there has been an amazing investigations team, and people have filtered letters that have arrived so that i did not have to see them. i have had people helping with that, sort of interface between the police, but actually, thatis between the police, but actually, that is because i am incredibly lucky and privileged. i have a voice in the media, and there arejust thousands of people who are going through exactly this same thing every day, who probably, you know, don't work with an organisation that may be understand that as well, have that help connecting the sort of various dots. actually, it will be a
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thousand times worse without that. that is why i think, actually, something has got to change. i don't understand... i don't properly understand... i don't properly understand whether it would be impossible for the police to just pursuit a prosecution based on the evidence that they have, and based ona training evidence that they have, and based on a training order that they already have, but in an ideal world, you would want to say, take the victim out of it, if it is a recurring thing, because there is nothing more i can say about it. i just have to keep reliving it every single time, and actually, we haven't really solved it. an update on the situation with regards to restoring power supplies. they say that engineers have restored power to more than 100,000 homes in east of england, today,
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after those damaging winds. particularly, they say across norfolk, suffolk, essex and cambridge. there are currently around 47,000 properties do without power, and they have additional engineers to work to restore it quickly and safely. they are urging the public to stay well clear of power lines, and anybody who has spotted one should report it. in a moment, a summary spotted one should report it. in a moment, a summary of the business news, but first the headlines. strong winds with gusts of up to 80 miles per hour batter parts of the uk, more than 60 thousand homes are left without power in the east of england. theresa may prepares to welcome france's president macron for his first summit in britain — border controls and brexit will dominate the agenda. a warning over patient safety from hospital consultants in wales as services are stretched, but better news in england as figures show winter pressure is easing in a and e. in the business news:
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apple says it will pay about $27 billion in tax on the cash it holds outside the united states because of president trump's recent tax reforms. the world's most valuable company is thought to have more than £180bn held outside the us and hasn't confirmed how much of that will be repatriated. the tech giant also says its planning to build a new tech campus— and create 20,000 newjobs in the us. the european manufacturer, airbus, has secured a new order for its a380 super—jumbos, easing concerns about the future of the world's largest passenger plane. emirates will buy up to 36 of the aircraft,
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costing $16 billion. earlier this week, airbus said it would halt production of the model unless it had another orderfrom emirates. the dubai—based airline had cut back on orders for the a380 in recent years. the latest figures on what families spend per week have just been published. they includes transport, housing, food and clothing costs. overall, the average weekly household spend, rose to £554.20 in the last financial year. spending was highest on transport costs — increasing by £5.40 to £7.90 a week. good morning taxpayers face a bill to private contractors totalling 199 billion pounds for schemes under the controversial private finance initiative, even if no further deals are struck, a spending watchdog's report has found. the national audit office found 716 deals are currently operational
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under pfi and its successor pf2, with annual charges amounting the report was compiled before the collapse of contractor carillion which was heavily reliant on pfi contracts. joining us now is peter koo—bik, licensed insolvency practitioner and partner at the accountancy group uhy hacker young. and i understand that... they are in the construction industry. all part of the building process that is related to the carillion projects. and what do they know about what is going to happen, and whether they will receive some of the money back from the remaining carillion assets? it is far too early for anyone to know how much is really going to get paid. it is all in relation to how much the liquidator... housing trust for the liquidator is... how do you come up with this 1p in every pound
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that they are owed. the banks have a first chart on all the money, and there is a sun which is maximised at £600,000, which is available to all trade and if that editors. we are aware it is in excess of £1 billion worth of creditors, and it is simple maths that there is not enough money to go around. what is the process, and what about the these subcontractors, how long will it ta ke subcontractors, how long will it take before they know whether or not they will receive any money?m take before they know whether or not they will receive any money? it is a very slow process, and until such times as the liquidator has finalised all of the sales of the assets that the company has, then it is impossible to say how much will be returned and when. many thanks for talking to us. and there has been a drop in sales at costa coffee —
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whitbread says the cafe business is tough on the high street— but it's share price rose as speculation mounted that the coffee business will be split from its hotel and restaurant chains. earlier on we ran through these numbers. on the headline numbers, it isa numbers. on the headline numbers, it is a fairly decent update. 6.8% total growth. all calls today for a fairly decent year, but u nfortu nately, fairly decent year, but unfortunately, the costa chain has been suffering a little bit from a downturn in football. this is going to reignite speculation, that actually the cost of business could get spun off. about a month ago, a hedge fund took a 3.4% stake in whitbread, and that will prompt speculation that they will want to see significant saving within the business. with a new chairman in march, i think these disappointing costa numbers are likely to reignite
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that debate. earlier this week tesco announced that it was cutting some of its clubcard rewards — and then quickly redacted this decision after customers started venting their anger online... experts believe that it is part of a wider trend. what do you think, do plastic card and their rewards make you more loyal to saddam shops? —— to certain shops. lets check in with the financial markets now britain's blue chip index, the ftse 100 is down so far today. it's stuffed full of international companies — so when the pound is stronger as it is at the moment against the dollar — the index tends to move in the opposite direction to sterling — as profits earned overseas will be worth
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less when exchanged. the pound is hovering around its highest levels since britain voted to leave the european union. i've highlighted associated british foods — primark owner — it says the fashion chain had record festive sales — but not such sweet news for its sugar arm — abf has warned significantly lower european sugar prices will have an impact on revenues going forward. that's all the business news. president trump has unveiled the list of ‘winners' in his "fake news awards." he took to twitter to announce thejournalists and media outlets he's branded as inaccurate. among the ‘winners' were cnn and the new york times. mr trump later tweeted to say there are a lot of reporters he does respect. a new rescue drone has been used to save the lives of two teenagers in australia, in what officials say is a world first. lifeguards in new south wales were training to use the new drone,
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when they heard two teenage boys were in distress in the surf off lennox head. within two minutes, they had used the device — called the ‘little ripper‘ — to drop an inflatable flotation device to the boys. the pair were then able to swim to shore. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather. there has been a lot going on this morning. we had quite a bit as though through the night. a beautiful scene this morning in cumbria. but, we have had another 15 centimetres of that snow falling through the night. 17 centimetres. quite a bit of snow across northern areas. that is not the whole story because it was wind that workers up through the night. the highest gusts of wind was in norfolk. 83 mph. that
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was brought by this area of low pressure, here. squeezing the ice bars across the eastern areas. this storm is now moving its way to germany and the netherlands. for us, much lighter winds throughout the afternoon, and we are looking at a mixture of shari spells and sunny —— sunny spells and showers. through this evening, it will be eyes that is the biggest issue across scotland, northern ireland, northern areas of england and wales. we will have the showers through the day, really, and the likes will sit around through the night. friday itself, fairly similar to today. there will be a good bit of sunshine in the central and eastern areas of
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england. 0ne in the central and eastern areas of england. one or two wintry showers over the moors. and over wales and up over the moors. and over wales and up into scotland, and also northern ireland as we go into friday afternoon, and temperatures are fairly similarto afternoon, and temperatures are fairly similar to what we are seeing today. factor in the wind, it will feel pretty chilly. how about the weekend, we will have this weatherford pushing its way in on saturday morning. that will largely clear away. there will be some... by sunday, this area of rain will continue to spread its way eastwards. as it does so, it will turn to snow over the pennines. some heavy rain for a time towards southern and western areas, but turning milder in the south—west with double figures, goodbye. this is bbc news.
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these are the top stories developing at 12pm: theresa may prepares to welcome president macron for his first summit in britain. border controls and brexit will dominate the agenda. britain is to spend an extra £44 million to bolster security in calais and will commit to taking in more migrants. strong winds with gusts of up to 70 miles per hour batter parts of the uk. almost 50,000 homes are left without power in the east of england. snow continues to cause problems elsewhere. a number of schools are closed and drivers are warned to take care. also this hour: a warning from doctors in wales that patient safety is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree". but better news in england as figures show an ease in pressure in a and e. bbc presenter emily maitlis reveals she fears a former friend who stalked her for two decades
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will never stop harassing her, just days after he is jailed. i think it‘s hard for everyone, actually, because you then turn into this person who shouts at your kids for the wrong thing... not because they‘ve done anything wrong but because you‘re stressing about something else. good afternoon. it‘s thursday the 18th of january. welcome to bbc newsroom live. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly £45 million and commit to taking in more migrants from calais. the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel
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macron this afternoon. their meeting, at the army‘s officer training academy in sandhurst, is being seen as the most important for several years. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. this summit is very deliberately being held at sandhurst, britain‘s military academy for officer cadets. the venue underlines the fact that britain and france are the key military powers in europe, used to working together and today, committing to greater cooperation. even if the background to all of this, of course, is brexit. and in other ways, britain and france are heading in very different directions. under pressure from president macron, theresa may will take on some migrants stuck in calais and desperate to cross the channel. so, expect more unaccompanied children to be allowed into britain as well as adults who successfully argue that their admission will reunify families. but the longer—term deals will focus on defence. britain is sending three british chinook
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helicopters to mali, they‘re large troop carrying aircraft which the french badly lacked in their fight against islamists. so, britain will broaden its military involvement in africa without committing troops. in return, france will back—up british forces in the baltic states of estonia. there, confronting the potential russian threat. james robbins, bbc news. and we will beat talking to iain duncan smith soon. police lincolnshire have appealed to the public to help unblock roads. a
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tree has been blocking this stretch of the railway, workers attempting to re m ove of the railway, workers attempting to remove and making some progress. and fiona trott has been in penrith. a66 closed eastbound. we have had a lot of snow on higher ground. 30 centimetres. rob wants also on the a19, 18 miles of tailbacks. it is not just the snow. a19, 18 miles of tailbacks. it is notjust the snow. winds have caused disruption. thousands of homes without power at suffolk, east anglia and cambridgeshire. gusts of over 80mph anglia and cambridgeshire. gusts of over80mph in anglia and cambridgeshire. gusts of over 80mph in norfolk. 3000 properties without power in lincolnshire. fallen trees. norfolk,
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cambridgeshire, lincolnshire. also damage at derbyshire, norfolk, surrey and gloucestershire. because of the strong winds, all but one railway line has been blocked. delays from manchester piccadilly, and from birmingham new street. at the north of england, the warming is about ice. motorists have been told to ta ke about ice. motorists have been told to take extra care. that was the latest from penrith. police scotland have advised that travel conditions across much of the country are extremely dangerous after heavy snowfall. a yellow weather warnings for strong winds up to 75mph has been issued for much of england and wales. when we spoke earlier, the traffic
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was moving better than it is now! yes. the traffic is still moving. everything is going as it should be. i would predict that the last lot of these tailbacks got through the tunnel behind me about 45 minutes ago. but they did go a good ten miles back to kent. the backlog really went on. this is a result of the qe2 bridge being caused by highways england at midnight. it was closed when winds were predicted to be more than 60,70 mph. depending on the direction. it is not unusual. when you are on the bridge, even with light winds, you can often feel the car being rocked around.
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and large lorries go to dover and the continent. this morning, those delays were really quite bad. this was my commute this morning. entering the m25, it normally takes about 15 minutes to get across. signs told me delays would be an hour. that was not the case. it took almost two hours. when i could see the bridge, we sat completely still for about 20, 25 minutes. the bridge reopened at about 20 past nine this morning. 0ver we drove. reopened at about 20 past nine this morning. 0verwe drove. but reopened at about 20 past nine this morning. 0ver we drove. but that was not the end. as i mentioned, i could see the tailbacks going back a long way. the tunnels that you can see, four lanes, two are diverted to the opposite direction. that is why on this site, tailbacks have been going
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on for a long time. thank you very much. and we can also go to coventry. i am assuming this is where the related damage the hinge? absolutely. weather—related. at five o‘clock this morning, the family inside heard a loud noise. has a bin fallen? the checked the front of the house, the back of the house, they we re house, the back of the house, they were obviously unable to check the side. they went back to bed! and then the neighbours started banging on doors. panicking. discovering that the entire gable end of the house had been blown off, massive gust of wind. no damage inside the house, the family just gust of wind. no damage inside the house, the familyjust relieved that nobody was injured. i am standing at
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the community centre car park, and usually on a thursday it is really busy. mums and tots. pensioners and language groups. but those have been cancelled. imagine if you had cars or children getting out, walking to the centre. if this had happened later in the day, rather than the early hours... thank goodness it did not. thank you for that, from coventry. the severe weather is battering the netherlands as well. in amsterdam, schiphol airport has cancelled all flights due to winds of up to 140 kilometres an hour. the notice came shortly after the national weather service upped its warning to the highest code red level. we can return to the uk and france.
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theresa may preparing to welcome president macron. i am joined by iain duncan smith. good afternoon. thank you forjoining us. we know that one of the aspects, britain increasing contribution towards border controls in france by almost £45 million. is this really a good dealfor the united £45 million. is this really a good deal for the united kingdom? £45 million. is this really a good dealfor the united kingdom? the united kingdom government always has to ask the simple question, what is and as for us? as i have been assured by those ministers, the reality is that this is going to massively improve the ability to be to sort migrants arriving from the french, and also secure the border too greater extent. i think this looks like it is going to be a good investment because it is going to
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yield a stronger border as we get ready to leave the european union and get better cooperation on the other side of the channel. i think that has got to be better for the united kingdom. it looks like a good investment. would this deal be if brexit happening, was not happening? does britain feel it has to do this, to smooth the path through brexit? getting the french on board? to smooth the path through brexit? getting the french on board7m to smooth the path through brexit? getting the french on board? if you remember, we gave just over 20 million to tidy up calais, fencing, everything else, because it benefited us. it benefits us to make sure that the french have got proper arrangements on the other side, limiting access of migrants that may wa nt to limiting access of migrants that may want tojump on the limiting access of migrants that may want to jump on the buses, coaches, hide on trains, trying to get across. it is going to benefit
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others, other aspects of course. 0ther others, other aspects of course. other aspects we want the european union to get on with, border areas tidied up, it is good for us when it comes to leaving the european union. as pa rt of comes to leaving the european union. as part of the deal, adults having to prove that arriving would be reunifying families. to that extent, we have not completely got all the numbers. iam we have not completely got all the numbers. i am told this is a commitment to get to the field number of young people that need to come over here on the wider context i think giving people the opportunity to be able to demonstrate that they have the right
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to come here those important. what britain needs to do and what we should talk more about is the amount of money that the uk has put into the camps around syria and turkey. enormous. it has dwarfed all of the other money from other countries in the policy of keeping people close to the country of origin so that they can go back to rebuild, it is the correct policy. the mistake was germany opening borders, letting people inside because it made a problem, chaos. the germans not putting as much money into the borders, the uk led the way. death is not about us saying no to migrants. it is actually saying look, we are building schools and hospitals and everything else. and bringing work and factories. so that they can ill loving. rather than trying to travel halfway across the
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world, to get to a country they do not know. restricting what we bring, those who have genuine needs, that is the reasonable way to do it by investing in these camps. i wish the rest of the european union had done as much as we have done in the past. idream to as much as we have done in the past. i dream to take these additional people, including children, a dream to increase the amount of money for border control, you can categorically say that is not a brexit bung? not going to be setting a dangerous precedent for other countries who think something could be extracted from the native kingdom in return for the process being eased through. i do not think so. i would be absolutely clear, i would not like the governmentjust to give france money because they have asked for it, some sort of future bribe. i
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do not think so. these levels of money, in terms of what government spend, very small indeed. i know it is relative. i think the important thing is that the summit today is a really important summit. the british and the french have always had a good relationship and they do a huge amount of trade with us and it is important that the french get on board with this idea, friendly, good neighbours, leaving the european union but not leaving europe. decent cooperation will suit the french because of exports, baubles, and because of exports, baubles, and because of exports, baubles, and because of defence and intelligence needs that they have got. we know that we bring in value. it is looking on the positive side and getting the french on side. i believe that this developing some of the tinkering some of the opposite
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voices. thank you very much. an upbeat, about the weather. we told you earlier, a wolf on the loose. we had told you that because it had escaped a damaged cage. still on the loose, last spotted in a village, close to berwickshire. eight miles from the conservation sank three. a reporter has said the police helicopter is helping and suckling overhead. animal experts on the ground, using tranquilliser darts to ca ptu re ground, using tranquilliser darts to capture the wolf safely. it is called mia. that‘s the wrong wolf! hoping it is going to be captured
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and returned safely to the century. patient safety in accident and emergency units in wales is being compromised to an "unacceptable degree" according to hospital consultants. a group of 46 doctors is warning of the risks in a letter sent to the first minister, which has been seen by bbc news. 0ur wales correspondent sian lloyd reports. attendances were 5.4% higher than 2017, putting that into context. 0ur wales correspondent, tomos morgan, is at the morriston hospital in swansea. that context is very important. i understand the target, 95% should be admitted, transfer, discharged with infour admitted, transfer, discharged with in four hours. but actually just 78.9% of patients within that time frame. that is correct. this is
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actually the worst december on record since the records began. that was 2009. i am a swansea, this was the worst performing hospital in december. 60% of patients seen in four hours but they have increased the numbers in 12 hours. that target is actually that nobody should be reading that one, an increase in the novel people that have had to wait for that period but as you said, a rise in patients coming in across wales. to go along with that, huge influx in the number of people coming to accident and emergency with flu related symptoms. exceeding the threshold barrier that they have got. the medical director here is said to me earlier that potentially the figures could get worse and
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potentially also at some of the other accident and emergency centres because of the flu situation. going back to that later that you mentioned previously, 46 consultants across accident and emergency in wales wrote to the first minister, explaining that they think the situation is dire. a crisis. calling foran situation is dire. a crisis. calling for an increase in social care funding, a review of acute social ca re funding, a review of acute social care beds, changing the way that we times are measured, and prioritising recruitment. the welsh government have said they have invested an additional 16 million, hopefully by march the figures are going to somehow come back to normality. in england, pressure on busy nhs units has begun to ease. that‘s according to officials. latest figures from nhs england up
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to last sunday showed ambulances experienced fewer delays waiting outside hospital compared to the previous week. the number of ambulances delayed beyond 30 minutes fells by nearly a quarter to 12,500. but the figures showed hospitals remain incredibly busy overall, with an average bed occupancy rate of 94.9% across trusts in england. in the last few moments, the new northern ireland secretary who was appointed last week has announced it is good to be a new round of talks towards the restoration of power sharing at stormont. what has quickly become clear to me, taken ashore. 0ne quickly become clear to me, taken ashore. one last agreement. without agreement we will be facing a set of political consequences that are going to represent a significant setback to the progress that has
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been made since the signing of the belfast agreement. that was on was 20 years ago. over the past eight months, the political parties, particularly dup and sinn fein have made progress in closing the gaps existing between them on a range of difficult issues that have prevented the formation of an executive. still significant differences. i also want to emphasise the role played by sdlp, and the alliance, who have made an active contribution and based on conversations so far, i believe it is possible to reach an agreement. all the parties have expressed a commitment to the restoration of the executive. they have indicated to me directly the willingness to engage in a constructive manner to try to reach an agreement. as short intense set
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of political talks to restore the executive will commence next wednesday. these will involve the five main parties, the british government and irish government in accordance with the stranded approach. initially, these talks will focus on gaining clarity, understanding the progress made, on a range of issues including the formation of the executive and legacy issues. progress must be swift. it is clear that northern ireland needs strong devolved government and politic leadership. the people of northern ireland cannot continue to have their public services suffer by the lack of an executive and without ministers meeting key policy and budget decisions. without an executive, northern ireland‘s voice on critical issues will not be heard as
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strongly. i will be updating parliament in westminster no later than the 7th of february on progress. without rapid progress, the british government will face significant decisions. these include setting a budget for 18/19, lma pay, the prospect of a folder selection and ultimately other arrangements to ensure that northern ireland is able to benefit from a good government, that people both need and deserve. that was karen bradley, the secretary of state for northern ireland, announcing short and intense talks going to begin next week to try to restore power sharing in northern ireland. time for the sport. johanna konta insisted there were positives to take from her second round exit at the australian open. she went out in straight sets
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to the world number 123 bernarda pera. konta, who was the ninth seed in the women‘s draw, struggled with the very hot conditions in melbourne. it was only the second time pera had ever won a grand slam match. it isa it is a little bit frustrating but also i think i am still taking good things from this. i am not, i do not feel by any means as though it is a massive catastrophe. i play every event to be there till the end. i definitely do not want to be going home this early, but i think in terms of building myself back up, and playing the way i want to play, i think and playing the way i want to play, ithinki and playing the way i want to play, i think ijust keep moving forward. there was a better day for six—time champion novak djokovic, who battled back from a set down in 39 degree heat to come past gael monfils to reach round three. former champion stan wawrinka is out though. hindered by his troublesome knee,
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he was soundly beaten by american tennys sandgren. he eased to a 6—2, 6—1, 6—4 win. arsenal manager arsene wenger has said a deal to take alexis sanchez to manchester united is "likely to happen" and has also been discussing his interest in henrikh mkhitaryan moving the other way as part of the deal. it‘s become clear that sanchez won‘t extend his contract at the emirates stadium beyond this summer — and with a proposed move to manchester city appearing to have fallen through, it seems old trafford will be his destination. it can happen. it cannot happen. really? i've bounced stages. do you think there is a chance he can play for arsenal again? of course. if it does not go through, he will be playing on saturday. things can break down. these things are never
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guaranteed. as part of the negotiations, a player coming in? mkhitaryan? do you like him? of course. if it is a possibility, i would play him. plenty more tra nsfers would play him. plenty more transfers before the end of the month. that‘s all the sport for now. we‘re just we‘rejust going to we‘re just going to update you on this wolf on the loose... wolf on the loose! it escaped from a sanctuary, last spotted near a village eight miles from the conservation sanctuary. it escaped from at some point overly, we are on the wolf sanctuary website! this was caused by the bad weather. high winds. causing damage to the fencing. it has allowed the wolf to
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escape! reporters have said that police and animal experts are trying to capture the wolf! tranquilliser dart. police helicopter overhead, trying to spot the animal. i would imagine it is feeling rather frightened. we hope that the wolf is found and returned safe and well! the public spending watchdog says taxpayers could face a bill of almost £200 billion for deals signed under private finance initiatives. the national audit 0ffice‘s report into pfis, schemes where the government can borrow from private firms to build police lincolnshire have appealed to the public to help unblock roads. defender more than 700 deals are still operational. the government said it has helped to fund vital projects. we can get more from westminster. norman is at
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westminster. norman is at westminster. i spoke to those involved with tony blair‘s project, still defending them as a way of getting major public projects running faster than otherwise wakening in taking out a mortgage. you knew you would be paying a lot backin you knew you would be paying a lot back in interest. clearly, concerns? the national audit office effectively divides the bill. day give us an indication about how much we as the taxpayer are going to be landed with. they have estimated it is about £200 billion over the next 25 years. crucially, suggesting that some of these schools and hospitals could have been built much more cheaply if the public sector had on it. suggesting that some schools have cost 40% more, one hospital 70%
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more. that has been seized upon by the labour party, jeremy corbyn has said that they would nationalise the existing contracts. i am joined by the treasury spokesman. this is odd. pfi was massively expanded under labour, under tony blair and gordon brown. it is about value for money. the expansion of pfi was because so much money in public services, wanting to make sure as much of the risk was transferred to the private sector. we have got to be willing to look at the evidence. it has clearly given us some evidence, that the cost wasjust so given us some evidence, that the cost was just so much given us some evidence, that the cost wasjust so much higher. we have to respond to that. and where it is cheaper for the taxpayer to get some of those contracts back, essentially nationalising these vehicles, if you get better value then the government have to look at that. labour is opposed as i
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understand to folder pfi contracts. does that not mean that pupils and patients are going to have to wait an awful lot longer for new hospitals and schools because simply no spare government cash to build those buildings? certainly the opportunity to fund those in a traditional framework. when people talk about debt on the government balance sheet, we are just getting back on the balance sheet. we believe that government taxation and borrowing should not be any fiscal allusion, it should reflect the liabilities. if that is the case it is possible to do that. given the fa ct we is possible to do that. given the fact we have such a good return from improving infrastructure, nothing to fear. what we should not do, do it ina way fear. what we should not do, do it in a way that actually costs the taxpayer more just because we want the fiscal allusion of keeping it off the balance sheet. this is not going to the cost free? taxpayer is
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going to the cost free? taxpayer is going to the cost free? taxpayer is going to have two stump up money? nationalise contracts? these are liabilities of the state that have to be met. if you have a cheaper way of doing that, we want a review of all these contracts. when it is in the public interest, that is certainly what we think is the correct way forward. it is in the powers of government to do that. it is about the political choice. how much do you estimate it would cost a future labour government to do this? it depends how many you are brought back in—house. there will have to be a review to do that. this report today shows that there is a big cost of not doing that, of leaving it to this finance model that has cost huge amounts. that is
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not justifiable. so, where that has cost huge amounts. that is notjustifiable. so, where there is money to be saved, and value to be had to be doing so, that is reasonable. we should say, this of course comes just after the whole carillion collapse which has dominated the headlines. that has played to some extent to mr corbyn‘s agenda. thank you very much, norman smith. and, the weather a big feature of the headlines today, as well. let‘s things are still looking very windy today. still 20 showers around. there is a falling of sleet and snow across england and scotland. more sunshine across eastern part of the
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country, but wherever you are, it will feel chilly. throughout a night, you will continue to see the sleet and snow, in lower levels across scotland and north—west england, as well. further south and east you are more likely to stay clear and dry, but a significant risk of ice. a cold and frosty start to the day tomorrow. still some heavy sleet and snow showers putting across northern ireland. a bit of brightness in between, but another cold and wintry day. top temperatures around two to 7 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines the uk is to spend nearly £45 million to beef up border security at channel ports.
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the deal will be announced at a meeting between theresa may and president emmanuel macron this afternoon. severe gales have been causing problems across the uk. there are 47,000 properties without power in the east of england, and many rail services have been disrupted. hospital consultants in wales have warned that patient safety in welsh a&e units is being "compromised to an unacceptable degree". meanwhile better news in england — latest figures show that hospitals remain very busy, but pressures have eased since last week. the public spending watchdog says taxpayers will have to pay nearly £200 billion for schemes set up under private finance initiatives. a survey by an educational charity suggests some parents are subsiding a childcare scheme for three and four year olds in england, which the government says is free. a terminally ill man from shropshire who wants to be helped to die has been granted permission to take his case to appeal.
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noel conway, who‘s 68 and has motor neurone disease, has won the first stage of his court of appeal bid to challenge a court ruling over his wish for a "peaceful and dignified" death. mr conway, who is a retired lecturer wants a doctor to be allowed to prescribe him a lethal dose of drugs. our medical correspondent fergus walsh has been following the case at the court of appeal for us. fergus, mind us more about the background to this, and the significance of today‘s ruling, if you would. well, mr conway who was too ill to attend court today, he is challenging the suicide act of 1961, which prohibits a doctorfrom giving him a lethal dose of drugs. he said that reaches his human rights. last 0ctober, he lost his case, he lost that challenge in the high court, but if you minutes ago, two court of
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appealjudges said that he should be given permission to go to the court of appealfor another given permission to go to the court of appeal for another full hearing. this case will now get another full hearing of the arguments on both sides. supporting him is the campaign group, dignity in dying, and with me is sarah from dignity in dying. what is your reaction?” and with me is sarah from dignity in dying. what is your reaction? i know that he is delighted. we are delighted to. it is terrific news for him and for the dignity in dying and has mac team. the cases 0n for him and for the dignity in dying and has mac team. the cases on and we want to get to the supreme court. what is the nub of the argument? he is arguing that his rights to family are compromised by the suicide act.
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he wants them to make a declaration that his human rights are convened, and that the law must be changed accordingly. only in 2015, mps holy rejected proposals that there should be this right to die. so, how can thejudges do be this right to die. so, how can the judges do anything to help you? they made very clear that he had institutional competence, the courts had the capacity to make that declaration. so, even if parliament decided against changing the law, the courts could say that the law needed changing because it was contravening human rights. now, i know that the mp5 decided to add a half years ago that this was not for them. but, ispoke half years ago that this was not for them. but, i spoke to a mp who had changes mind. you have got to look at the context over seas. in australia, the state of victoria,
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new zealand might as well. since the mps change their mines, california has legalised. this is on track for britain. we know that he is terminally ill. he may not have six months to live. when is this case going to be heard? well, i am hoping that it going to be heard? well, i am hoping thatitis going to be heard? well, i am hoping that it is heard before easter. there was a request for it to be expedited. we hope that it is before easter. what about the argument that if you allow a right to die, than for the disabled and the vulnerable, it could turn very quickly into a duty to die, and people could be pressurised. there is no evidence overseas. in fact, the opposite is true, because it gives much greater scrutiny to the decisions that people are taking at the end of life. i think it is pretty obvious that if you are prepared to talk
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about your wishes and noises at the end of life in advance of taking any action, then that will be much safer. the supreme court, made exactly that point. the president said, that changing the law would be a safer option. sarah from dignity in dying, thank you very much. so, another twist in this case, and in this key issue about end of life, and whether there should be this right to die. the appeal court judges will give their written reasons as to why they are allowing this appeal, and the appeal itself will probably be in a few months‘ time. thank you so much, fergus. more now on our top story. britain is to increase its contribution towards border controls in france by nearly £45 million, and commit to taking in more migrants from calais.
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the deal will be announced at a summit between theresa may and the french president emmanuel macron this afternoon. their meeting — at the army‘s officer training academy in sandhurst — is being seen as the most important for several years. in a moment will take to our diplomatic correspondent paul adams first to vicki young who is at sandhurst. vicky, what do we know about how the two lea d e rs vicky, what do we know about how the two leaders get along, and what is going to be happening there this afternoon? well, they are due to arrive here in just afternoon? well, they are due to arrive here injust over an hour. there will be an inspection of officers here, including cadets, those who are training. they will then have those crucial bilateral talks, and then we will know what they have discussed when they have a press co nfe re nce they have discussed when they have a press conference later on this afternoon. this is a crucial relationship, particularly of course ina relationship, particularly of course in a post—brexit world. this is very much all about how britain is going to forge relationships, what it leaves the eu, and of course that relationship with in france, is incredibly important, not just relationship with in france, is incredibly important, notjust the £71 billion worth of trade between
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thejudges, but £71 billion worth of trade between the judges, but security corporations. no coincidence that we are here at than cost —— at sandhurst. the uk will help france in mali by providing helicopters. but, i think it is broader than that. this is about emmanuel macron. it is not an entirely straightforward relationship in those terms. today, they will be trying to emphasise what they have in common. the issue of border security has long been an issue. britain are deciding today that they will give more money to boost security, there. they are going to try and prevent illegal migrants
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making that journey across try and prevent illegal migrants making thatjourney across the channel. france wants that to happen, as well. the residents of calais have dismantled the so—called jungle, —— the residents of calais do not like what is happening there. they have dismantled the so—called jungle. now, here is is calling for changes, saying that britain should ta ke changes, saying that britain should take more migraines, we will see where they get to, later this afternoon. ok, thank you so much. we will be back at sandhurst when theresa may and emmanuel emily macron —— immanuel macron are there later on. a inquest has been blocked.
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bbc presenter emily maitlis reveals she fears a former friend who stalked her for two decades will never stop harassing her, just days after he is jailed. she said that it had had a devastating impact on herfamily. itjust makes you jumpy, you know. and, actually, that is stressful, and it is tiring, and it is time—consuming, and, you know, i think it‘s hard for everyone, actually, because you then turn into this person who sort of shouts at your kids for the wrong thing, not because they have done anything wrong, but because you are stressing
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about something else. you are having to think about things that are ludicrous, you know, like how you get in and out of the front door, and how they are getting back from school. it is not that you think everybody is out to kill you, you recognise that as a paranoia, but, it doesn‘t make it any easier, it just means that you are... you are just not living normally, you know. i get lovely messages of support from people saying, you must be so relieved it‘s all over. he is in prison. ijust think, you don‘t understand that this has literally been going on for 20 years.
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it feels like a sort of chronic illness, sort of thing, for me. it‘s not like it ever goes away. it‘s not like i ever believe that the system will make him stop. partly, it is the legal system, but partly it is... we haven‘t clearly found a way of finding something that is both deterrent and helpful to the perpetrator, in a way that would make them stop. something you just said there is very striking. you don‘t believe it will ever stop? no. you think you will have to live with us for the rest of life? i don‘t think about it. my way is to deny it completely. i never want to see photos, i never want to here names, i never want to read about it, i never actually... i never want to talk about it. well, i know, and i know this is the first time you have spoken on a microphone about it, and this is very difficult for you. you want to carry on with your life and not be defined by this. one thing that i would say is that i have been really well sheltered
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for most of this, in a sense, because, i have worked in an organisation with a lot of pastoral care. there has been an amazing investigations team, and people have filtered letters that have arrived so that i did not have to see them. i have had people helping with that, sort of interface between the police, but actually, that is because i am incredibly lucky and privileged. i have a voice in the media, and there are just thousands of people who are going through exactly this same thing every day, who probably, you know, don‘t work with an organisation that understands that as well, have that help connecting the sort of various dots. actually, it would be a thousand times worse without that. that is why i think, actually, something has got to change. i don‘t understand...
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i don‘t properly understand whether it would be impossible for the police to just pursue a prosecution based on the evidence that they have, and based on a restraining order that they already have, but in an ideal world, you would want to say, take the victim out of it, if it is a recurring thing, because there is nothing more i can say about it. ijust have to keep reliving it every single time, and actually, we haven‘t really solved it. and joining me now relying, one of those who has been warned to stay
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indoors. we heard by social media. 0ne indoors. we heard by social media. one of the local councillors put out a mere message advising people to stay in, and obviously if you come across the world, don‘t go near it, which i would busy say is sensible information. yes, common-sense advice. and had he been aware at that point that a love had a skate? there was a police activity this morning. helicopters overhead, and it isa morning. helicopters overhead, and it is a quiet place. a normal village, so we will rarely get any kind of thing like that going on, here. so, we looked on social media and we saw the message. were you aware of the will factory —— wolf sanctuary, had you ever visited? gana it has always been. it‘s a lovely pa rt gana it has always been. it‘s a lovely part of the community —— yes it has always been here. a positive
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attraction for the local area. do you feel that the warning is sensible? do you have plans to go out and disregard at some point?” think it is sensible. i have to admiti think it is sensible. i have to admit i had a local surgery this morning, as i am going to malawi at the end of the month, so it was a decision between getting malaria ta blets decision between getting malaria tablets and getting eaten by a will. i took the risk and i am back indoors now. but, apparently be wolf has now moved to eight miles away.” suspect the world might be quite scared of the people, rather than the other way round. you are waiting on some updates, i guess, daniel, to decide what you are to do next.” don‘t think there is any great panic. like i said, the area is
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pretty quiet, although there is less people on the treats than their normally would be. —— on the streets. it is no fault of their own, it is one of those things. we are hoping that the wolf can be reca ptu red are hoping that the wolf can be recaptured safely, and brought back to the factory. as long as it is reca ptu red to the factory. as long as it is recaptured safely, then there is no harm done. thank you, daniel. woody allen‘s adopted daughter has appeared on cbs this morning to talk about her sexual assault claim against the director. allen was investigated over a 1992 claim by dylan farrow that he sexually assaulted her at the family‘s connecticut home. prosecutors did not charge the film—maker and he has always denied the allegations, which he claims had been fabricated by his former partner mia farrow. this is really what she is —— why
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shouldn‘t i want to bring him down? why shouldn‘t i be angry, why shouldn‘t i be hurt? why shouldn‘t i feel some sort of outrage that after all these years, being ignored and disbelieved, and tossed aside... and after a ll disbelieved, and tossed aside... and after all these years, why should they believe you now?” after all these years, why should they believe you now? i suppose that is on them. but, all i can do is speak my truth and hope. hope. hope that somebody will believe me instead of just hear that somebody will believe me instead ofjust hear me. scotland yard says it‘s investigating a third complaint of sexual assault against the actor, kevin spacey. the allegation relates to an incident in westminster in 2005. kevin spacey, who has not been
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charged with any offences, has denied previous claims against him. police in portugal and spain have broken up an international drug smuggling ring that used boxes of fruit to bring in cocaine from south america. authorities found more than 700 kilogrammes of the drug hidden in pineapples packed in shipping containers. nine people have been arrested. parents in england are subsidising free nursery care because it hasn‘t been properly funded by the government — that‘s according to a survey published today. since september, parents working more than 16 hours a week have been able to claim 30 hours of free childcare. but many nurseries say they‘re struggling to cover costs and are having to ask parents to cover the cost of nappies and lunches. the government says the funding was never intended to cover the cost of meals or additional services, and that it is investing £6 billion pounds in childcare by 2020.
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it is not free to provide as we are subsidising this policy. it is not freedom to their parents and their children. we would love for it to be replaced with bonded or subsidised. —— the word free to be replaced with funded or subsidised. president trump has unveiled the list of ‘winners‘ in his "fake news awards." he took to twitter to announce thejournalists and media outlets he‘s branded as inaccurate. among the ‘winners‘ were cnn and the new york times. mr trump later tweeted to say there are a lot of reporters he does respect. a new rescue drone has been used to save the lives of two teenagers in australia, in what officials say is a world first. lifeguards in new south wales were training to use the new drone, when they heard two teenage boys were in distress in the surf off lennox head. within two minutes, they had used the device — called the ‘little ripper‘ — to drop an inflatable flotation device to the boys. the pair were then able to swim to shore. its saxophones are considered among the best in the world and have been
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played by jazz legends. but now french company henri selmer paris is selling a majority stake to an investment fund because of growing competition from china. the move brings to an end more than 100 and 30 years of family control over the firm, although the founder‘s great grandson with still be involved with the company. sarah corker reports. these saxophones are so famous that they have been sent into space. one was played in space last year. but, with growing competition from
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chinese manufacturers, they need to modernise. the decision to sell a majority stake of the family firm, is designed to do just that. translation: this change will bring a new momentum, any dynamic for the family. we will have a shareholder which will be able to guarantee our investments. thanks for that, we will be able to calmly carry on with developing our company. on the these eggs seem, —— on the music scene, the selmer sound shape several generations. they are still plagued by the most famous jazz stars. today, top of the range, selmer saxophones can set you back as much as 23,000 euros. the firm‘s new investor says that more than a century of know—how would be lost, but some part of the production line
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can be automated. this marks a new chapter in the company‘s long history. in a moment the news at one with sophie raworth. first the weather with sarah keith—lucas. good afternoon, well the cold wintry theme is set to continue. things will not be as wild, though. here is a scene from north yorkshire. it shows the extent of the lying snow, there. we are set to see a bit more snow, too. the main low—pressure clearing its way to the east. that has brought heavy wayne strong winds and snow. we are now left with a north—westerly. as we had through this evening, these showers will be increasingly falling as sleet and snow. across this we are likely to see some difficult driving
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conditions. risks of ice, and temperatures below freezing. many of us... eight in the morning, across the west of scotland, still plenty of heavy snow cards. a bit drier and brighterfor of heavy snow cards. a bit drier and brighter for eastern scotland, but sleet and snow showers across northern ireland and across the west of england, too. south across the country, is only some of the showers will be falling. clear and dry for eastern part of england, but towards the south—west of england and wales, that makes of rain, sleet, and hill ‘s note showers. also a fair bit of sunshine on the cards between the showers. we will be seeing a lot of dry weather in the east. temperatures on friday two 27 degrees, but feeling colder. saturday, we have got a small bridge of high pressure. a weather front across southern and western part of
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the country could bring rain early on, but it is looking... we have got some sunshine on offer. saturday night into sunday, the next area of pressure. it will bring some areas of rain, and perhaps some snow on the northern part of the country. turning briefly, but it will not be as windy as we have seen recently. temperatures turning milder. so, during the weekend, saturday mostly dry with a bit of sunshine, but wet and windy on sunday. by, for now. the uk pledges more than £40 million more to help border security at the channel. it‘ll be spent on fencing, cctv and new technology in calais and other border points to deal with the migrant problem. the money will be formally agreed at a summit between the prime minister and the french president this afternoon. britain will also agree to take more migrants. also this lunchtime: trees down blocking railway lines, after severe gales cause disruption to much of the uk with
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gusts of around 80mph. a wolf is on the loose in berkshire after the gales blew down a fence at a local sanctuary. police are hunting it, as children are warned to stay inside. patient safety in a&e units in wales is being "compromised to an unacceptable degree" say doctors. we‘ve got patients in the department where we don‘t have space to see them, and then we are coming back the next day and some of the
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